Spa Disinfection

Are you keeping your spa safe?

 

WILL THINGS EVER GO BACK TO BEING NORMAL?

Yes and no. Viruses and bacteria that can lead to infections and illness have always been present in personal care facilities. Coronavirus has merely demonstrated the ability for germs to spread rapidly when left unchecked. If you were not diligent in your infection prevention practices prior to the outbreak, then life will not return to the way things were for you. In a post-pandemic world, your clients will be more vigilant and aware of the measures being taken to keep them safe. Not just from COVID, but other everyday germs that can spread influenza, C. difficile, Pseudomonas, and other skin-related infections. When it comes to keeping pathogens out of your spa, the new norm is no different than the old standard.

WHAT IS THE BIGGEST MISCONCEPTION ABOUT PREVENTING THE SPREAD OF GERMS IN A SPA?

Disinfectants do not kill on contact, and yet we find the practice of immediately wiping a surface down after disinfecting is still commonplace. It is all the more a bad habit given some disinfectants need to keep a surface wet for as long as 10 minutes to do their job! Anything short of that, and you’re not achieving the requisite time to eradicate pathogens and stop their potentially deadly spread.

While disinfectants all share the common goal of killing pathogens, they are not all created equal.

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Nicole Kenny
NKenny@lne.com

Nicole Kenny has 20 years of experience as a technical consultant, educator, trainer and author working in the field of environmental science, environmental hygiene and chemical disinfection for infection prevention. She is the Vice President of Technology Platform Marketing at Virox Technologies Inc., and has been involved in a number of guideline committees including the CSA Decontamination Subcommittee, and is currently a member of IPAC-Canada's Corporate Relations Committee and IPACCanada's Scientific Program Committee. In 2014, Nicole was named one of Infection Control Today's "Who's Who in the Infection Prevention Industry".



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