Molecular Madness - Les Nouvelles Esthétiques & Spa
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Molecular Madness

Uncovering the truth behind Low Molecular Weight Hyaluronic Acid

 

Is it possible that our industry, often fueled by marketing compelling stories rather than science-based facts, could have it completely wrong as it relates to Hyaluronic Acid, its spectrum of molecular weights, and the value it provides to the skin?

As a cosmetic chemist and 20-year industry veteran, I have seen my fair share of ingredients come available to us, each with varying levels of evidence to support topical usage. However, barring a few comically absurd ingredients (I am looking at you, Snail Snot & Sheep Placenta), no ingredient comes as close to being as illogical in the anti-aging world as Low Molecular Weight Hyaluronic Acid (LMW-HA) does.

It is very rare that I would use the term irrefutable in a scientific conversation, but when it comes to the overwhelmingly abundant evidence within the human physiology and biochemistry literature that elucidates the pro-inflammatory behavior of LMW-HA, the data is just that…irrefutable. Let’s start with the basics.

Topically applied HA is far too large of a molecule to penetrate an intact Stratum Corneum, though interesting evidence does exist showing cutaneous HA penetration independent of molecular mass

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Daniel Clary
DClary@lne.com

Daniel Clary is a cosmetic chemist, licensed esthetician, and passionate 20-year aesthetic industry veteran. He has spent his entire career immersed in cosmetic chemistry, skin physiology, and molecular/cellular biology, learning from some of the greatest minds in the industry. He is currently the VP of Education/R&D for a regenerative medical aesthetic company, working in stem cell science and biologics.



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